Word of the Day


20140115-080328.jpg

chinoiserie \sheen-wah-zuh-REE\
noun: a style in art (as in decoration) reflecting Chinese qualities or motifs; also : an object or decoration in this style
Examples:
We admired our host’s daring taste in home décor, which combined spare modern elements with chinoiserie.

“Bamboo chairs vie with 19th-century lacquered armoires, nooks covered in chinoiserie toile and paisley-block prints exude irresistible coziness, and whimsical yet inviting rooms reflect a confluence of historical periods ranging from Rococo to Regency.” — From an article by Lindsay Talbot in Harper’s Bazaar, October 1, 2013
Did you know?
In 1670, King Louis XIV had the Trianon de Porcelaine erected at Versailles. It was a small structure—a pleasure house built for the king’s mistress—and it was decorated with chinoiserie and faced with faience tiles with a blue and white chinoiserie pattern. The building persists in history as the first major example of chinoiserie—the English word is borrowed straight from French, which based the word on “chinois,” its word for “Chinese”—but the trend it began long outlasted the building itself, which was destroyed a mere 17 years later to make way for the Grand Trianon. Chinoiserie itself was popular throughout the 17th and 18th centuries and enjoyed a brief revival in the 1930s. And people still enjoy it today.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s