Word of the Day


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kith \KITH\
noun: familiar friends, neighbors, or relatives
Examples:
Alan looked forward to the annual block party as a way to stay connected with his kith.

“Many urban dwellers, embedded in networks of kith and kin, wouldn’t dream of swapping the spiciness of the city for the white-bread pleasures of suburbia.” — From an article by David L. Kirp in The New York Times, October 20, 2013
Did you know?
“Kith” has had many meanings over the years. In its earliest uses it referred to knowledge of something, but that meaning died out in the 1400s. Another sense, “one’s native land,” had come and gone by the early 1500s. The sense “friends, fellow countrymen, or neighbors” developed before the 12th century and was sometimes used as a synonym of “kinsfolk.” That last sense got “kith” into hot water after people began using the word in the alliterative phrase “kith and kin.” Over the years, usage commentators have complained that “kith” means the same thing as “kin,” so “kith and kin” is redundant. Clearly, they have overlooked some other historical definitions, but if you want to avoid redundancy charges, be sure to include friends as well as relatives among your “kith and kin.”

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