Word of the Day


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utopia \yoo-TOH-pee-uh\
noun: an impractical scheme for social improvement
Examples:
To some people, gated communities are visions of Utopia—safe, quiet, and out of the way.

“Peninsula Players has entertained generations of audiences since it was founded in 1935 by a brother-and-sister team, Caroline and Richard Fisher, who dreamed of an artistic utopia where actors, designers and technicians could focus on their craft while being surrounded by nature in a contemplative setting.” — From an article in the Green Bay Press-Gazette, March 12, 2014
Did you know?
In 1516, English humanist Sir Thomas More published a book titled Utopia. It compared social and economic conditions in Europe with those of an ideal society on an imaginary island located off the coast of the Americas. More wanted to imply that the perfect conditions on his fictional island could never really exist, so he called it “Utopia,” a name he created by combining the Greek words “ou” (meaning “no, not”) and “topos” (meaning “place,” a root used in our word “topography”). The earliest generic use of “utopia” was for an imaginary and indefinitely remote place. The current use of “utopia,” referring to an ideal place or society, was inspired by More’s description of Utopia’s perfection.

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