Word if the Day


egregious \ih-GREE-juss\
adjective: conspicuous; especially : conspicuously bad : flagrant
Examples:
It was an egregious breach of theater etiquette on Eugene’s part when he left his cell phone on during the play and it rang during an important scene.

“Stanford still leads in the nation in scoring defense, but had perhaps the most egregious defensive breakdown of the weekend, failing to cover a Notre Dame receiver who scored the winning touchdown on a fourth-down pass with 1:01 left.” — Jake Curtis, San Francisco Chronicle, October 5, 2014
Did you know?
Egregious derives from the Latin word egregius, meaning “distinguished” or “eminent.” In its earliest English uses, egregious was a compliment to someone who had a remarkably good quality that placed him or her eminently above others. That’s how English philosopher and theorist Thomas Hobbes used it in flattering a colleague when he remarked, “I am not so egregious a mathematician as you are.” Since Hobbes’ day, however, the meaning of the word has become noticeably less complimentary, possibly as a result of ironic use of its original sense.

IMG_0988.PNG

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s