Word of the Day 


indomitable
  ;
adjective: incapable of being subdued : unconquerable 

Examples:

The memorial celebrates the indomitable spirit of the pioneers who ventured forth in search of a new life.
“The stones, removed as part of structural improvements to the bridge, speak to the indomitable nature of 19th-century workers, often immigrants, who somehow—with horses and pulleys— managed to move around that staggering weight.” — Sean Kirst, Syracuse.com (New York), June 16, 2015

Did you know?

The prefix in- means “not” in numerous English words (think of indecent, indecisive, inconvenient, and infallible). When in- teamed up with the Latin domitare (“to tame”), the result was a word meaning “unable to be tamed.” Indomitable was first used in English in the 1600s as a synonym of wild, but over time its sense of untamability turned from a problem to a virtue. By the 1800s, indomitable was being used for people whose courage and persistence helped them to succeed in difficult situations.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s